Knowledge Labs: Hiring Employees with Disabilities

December 7, 2021 | Hamilton, ON
Contributed by Catherine Connelly, Professor / Canada Research Chair of Organizational Behaviour Tier II

 

Professor and Canada Research Chair in Organizational Development Catherine Connelly discusses the business case for hiring people with disabilities. The costs aren’t as high as expected, turnover tends to be lower, and these employees are loyal. Read more about Professor Connelly’s research in The Conversation.

Knowledge Labs: In the Know is a web series where experts from the DeGroote School of Business offer their insights into current affairs. Keep up with the series.

Catherine Connelly

Catherine Connelly

Professor, Human Resources & Management / Canada Research Chair of Organizational Behaviour Tier II

Dr. Catherine Connelly holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Organizational Behaviour, and is a Member Emeritus of the College of New Scholars of the Royal Society of Canada (RSC). She is a former associate editor for Human Relations and currently serves on several editorial boards including the Journal of Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Management Review, and the Academy of Management Discoveries journal. Her research focuses on the attitudes, behaviours, and experiences of non-standard workers (e.g., temporary agency workers, contractors, temporary foreign workers), the effects of leadership styles on leader well-being, and knowledge hiding in organizations. Catherine also conducts applied research with several Canadian organizations in both the private and non-profit sector. In addition to her research success, Catherine is a past winner and frequent teaching award nominee for her teaching in the MBA and PhD programs. She has made presentations about her research to industry and academic groups across Canada and the US, and in Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Germany, Spain, and Portugal. Her research has been featured in the New York Times, the Globe and Mail, the National Post, and on CTV and CBC radio and TV.

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